Wool, Wiltshire and All Manner of Wonderful Things!

Posts tagged ‘North York Moors’

Moors Tour Bus

Hop aboard the Tour Bus for a trip to the Moors, where the heather has reached its magnifcent best.

What a place to live hey, the air smells of honey and the noise from the bees deafening.

Beware when the heather disappears and its place there is sedge grass- there be bogs.

Beekeepers take full advantage of the heather and with permission from the landowner move their bee hives to gain full advantage from the heather.

Only after we had walked past these hives

with bees buzzing round them, did I think it a very silly idea.

“We shouldn’t go back that way” I said. “But how do we get back to the car?” said Mr E, “we can’t walk across the moor with no footpath.” And of course he is right you should never ever just set off across the moors without proper provisions etc etc, people get lost all the time.

“But we only walked in a straight line and along a bit, I can hear the road and there are sheep tracks!” Poor Mr E couldn’t hear the road, and for a clever chap he has no sense of direction at all. For a less clever lady , I do. But it is hard going walking through heather. Which was how I realised that these stones that act as way marks really do work.  You see them from afar and know you are going in the right direction as you head towards them. This one  near where we left the car, served as our guide. Our ancestors sure knew a thing or two.

If you would like to read more about the heather on our moors , go here

Hope you have enjoyed the little visit to the wonderful moors. The heather lasts for such a short time, you just have to seize the moment.

One a week Photo Challenge- Cross

The Ralph Cross, on the North York Moors. This is a way mark for travellers on the moors, before the days of Sat Nav. Picture taken August 2014, from my archive.

Next week’s prompt is Fiction.

Happy Snapping!

Cropton.

One of my 17 for 2017 goals is to write 12 posts about our lovely Yorkshire villages. The first of these features the village of Cropton which lies about 5 miles from Pickering on the edge of the North York Moors. Some of the houses are now holiday cottages, the school has closed and any shops have vanished, but there is still a thriving local community, with an active WI ( Women’s Institute) , Village Hall, public house, and parish church which is open every day. Let’s explore.

The spreading chestnut tree greets you as you approach the village, the bench is there for the rather spectacular view down the valley.  I think this must be all that remains of a village green.

Village pump and water for passing horses and dogs.

Looking up the main street which runs through the village.

This building is now the village hall, called a reading room. Reading rooms were usually built by public subscription from the more well to do, to provide a meeting place for villagers to meet, read the newspapers of the day and borrow worthy books. An alternative to the pub! Recently refurbished thanks to the efforts of the villagers and the lottery fund.

The old school, looking a bit worse for wear. I love the school bell, imagine being summoned to school by that. Hopefully this building will be renovated and no doubt become a home for someone.  The house next door was full of workmen when I visited.

The thatch was new and there was much banging and hammering coming from within.

A row of typical village houses. Note the chimneys to the right side of the roof and the front doors to the centre. Apparently that is the local style of building in these parts and if you want to build a new house in Ryedale, this is the standard to which they MUST conform. The red pantiles are traditional to this area too.

This however is my favourite house

It’s called Cruck cottage and is a delight. Cruck being the timber frame on which old homes were built.

Now Cropton doesn’t have any claims to fame, but infamy is a different kettle of fish. If you are of a nervous/weak disposition  or just ate your dinner, do not read the rest of this paragraph. In 1872 Joseph Wood (58) and his son ( he had two sons aged 9 and 4, not certain which one this was) vanished without a trace from their farm. Mr Wood had taken to carrying large sums of money about his person. On 17 May Robert Charter, cousin to Mr Wood , said they had just gone away. Mr Wood’s brother John who also lived in Cropton thought this unlikely as Joseph had not told him. It transpired that their older brother William knew nothing either.  A letter purporting to come from Joseph was posted in Liverpool, but John said it wasn’t Joseph’s writing.

In July the police and John went to the farm in which Robert was now living. There was a very strange smell from one of the buildings. Robert said it was putrid meat he had found. In September a proper search was conducted revealing watches, boots,, clothing and amputated limbs which were subsequently identified as Joseph Wood. In November there was yet another search and this time child’s boots were found in a boiler house used for the preparation of cattle food. I shan’t go any further with this story! ( information of this tale comes from “Round and About The North Yorkshire Moors” by Tom Scott Burns and Martin Rigg which I borrowed this morning after my visit).

Villagers pulled down Robert Charters own house  such was his notoriety. Robert Charter was sent to prison for murder but released after a long prison service. He became a Methodist preacher and died in the workhouse in Malton.

Moving swiftly on, I found this being used as a garden ornament

At the far end of the street and across the fields is the village church of St Gregory. Now this church was rebuilt in Queen Victoria’s reign, but there was probably a church back here in Saxon times. Bit more info here

Can you imagine a more idyllic place to be buried?

My Godmother who is also a cousin of some sort ( Dad and Joan were cousins, although she was 15 years older than him), just so happens to be buried here. Aunty Joan and her husband had a farm just outside the village in the valley below.

Did I mention a castle? Probably not as there is not a great deal to see these days, just the motte ( hill where the keep was) and Bailey (courtyard).

But by golly there is a good view from up there.

Are you feeling a bit hot and bothered by all this exploring, let’s find that pub.

Oh my Gosh, it has its own brewery too, around which you can take a tour – New Inn brewery. 

Saved the best till last, hey? I am told it is very, very good beer, and there is a campsite right next door.

Cheers everyone, I hope you enjoyed the visit., and will come with another time.

 

 

 

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